To the main content

Munich Philharmonic: VerdiDaniele Gatti (conductor)

Portrait of the singer Okka Von Der Damerau
Copyright: Simon Pauly

Some would say that Verdi’s best opera is his Requiem. Although meant tongue-in-cheek, there is an element of truth in this. For with its dramatic, at times theatrical passages, Verdi’s Messa da Requiem has features more usually associated with opera. This goes especially for the grand Dies Irae, which is known beyond the classical music world through its use in films and video games.

Some would say that Verdi’s best opera is his Requiem. Although meant tongue-in-cheek, there is an element of truth in this. For with its dramatic, at times theatrical passages, Verdi’s Messa da Requiem has features more usually associated with opera. This goes especially for the grand Dies Irae, which is known beyond the classical music world through its use in films and video games.

  • Marina Rebeka, soprano
  • Iulia Maria Dan, soprano
  • Okka von der Damerau, mezzo-soprano
  • Francesco Meli, tenor
  • Alex Esposito, bass
  • Munich Philharmonic Choir; Andreas Herrmann, rehearsal
  • Munich Philharmonic
  • Daniele Gatti, conductor

Verdi’s emphatic portrayal of the Last Judgement resembles an apocalyptic journey to hell and can hardly be surpassed in its dramatic brunt. Alongside this vision of terror, Verdi, with delicate, rapturous sounds, depicts the assurance of redemption and eternal rest. The work’s nucleus, however, is the final movement, Libera me, which was originally written in commemoration of Gioachino Rossini, who had recently died. With an exquisite quartet of soloists, including Focus artist Okka von der Damerau, and the Philharmonic Choir guaranteeing vocal sound of the finest, Daniele Gatti presents Verdi’s “best opera” at the Isarphilharmonie.

Programme

Giuseppe Verdi: “Messa da Requiem” for four solo voices, choir and orchestra